Skip to content

Articles to forward to faculty.

July 11, 2011

As an information literacy librarian, one piece of information I like to keep my eye out for are articles which support the inclusion of information literacy into the curriculum, but that are not written academic librarians. Articles such as the one published on July 6th at the Courier-Journal.com website, can provide support for the outreach and instruction mission of the library. They can help to situate librarians within the larger conversations of the academic community, and they are great resources to forward onto faculty!

The article by Daniel F. Sullivan linked above advocates for a liberal arts education in the Business major, because the liberal arts focus on lifelong learning skill such as “inquiry and analysis; critical and creative thinking; integrative and reflective thinking; written and oral communication; quantitative literacy; information literacy; intercultural understanding; teamwork and problem solving” is valuable in this modern world. Sullivan says that “it is an enormous challenge for those of us in higher education leadership to break through an anxiety-fueled policy and public dialogue that too often treats college as a 21st century version of trade school when our nation’s economic vitality depends on our producing very different results — vastly increased numbers of college graduates with a liberal education who really can lead businesses to success in the extremely competitive global political economy of today.” In his article Sullivan also cites two additional resources that might also be useful for librarians to be aware of when talking with faculty about the need to teach students information literacy skills.

1. A 2009 report from The National Association of College Admissions counseling called Raising the Bar: Employers’ Views on College Learning in the Wake of the Economic Downturn

2. Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses (published 2011)

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: