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“Open and Shut: The Case for OA in Libraries” – Register now!

April 23, 2014

CRD SPRING PROGRAM

Open and Shut: The Case for OA in Libraries

REGISTRATION is now open for the spring program!

* Download the BROCHURE and find full details below.

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Expanded Session Descriptions and Presenter Bios

“Benefits and Implementation of Open Access Policies” with Sue Kriegsman

Open-access (OA) literature is defined by Peter Suber as “digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions.”

Sue will describe Harvard University’s experience with open access, making scholarly information freely available to all,  and the benefits to faculty. She will discuss the elements of an open access policy, the critical step of engaging stakeholders, and implementation options. There will be time for discussion after the presentation.

Sue Kriegsman is the Program Manager for the Harvard Library Office for Scholarly Communication. She identifies and implements ways for Harvard to open, share, and preserve scholarship. Sue has worked at Harvard since 2001 on a variety of digital initiatives such as the Harvard-Google book digitization project as the Project Manager. She also manages the Harvard Library Lab that is an internal grant program to create lightweight, open, and scalable projects bringing innovation to the Library. Prior to Harvard, she was the Project Manager for the Colorado Digitization Project.

“Open Access: Where Are We Now and How Did We Get Here?” with Tom Reinsfelder & John Barnett

Open access to scholarship has been gaining momentum for well over a decade. As academic librarians, we have an opportunity to educate others about open access publishing and advocate for the best interests of our libraries, our institutions, and our researchers. The presenters will describe past situations and actions that have led to current conditions and practices, highlighting recent developments in open access publishing, policy, and legislation. Whether new to the idea of open access or if one has been following the movement for many years, it is critical to keep up with the frequent and often dramatic developments.  Participants will learn more about open access, past and present, and will gain knowledge and resources to better support faculty and students at their institutions.

John Barnett is the Scholarly Communications Librarian at the University of Pittsburgh. He is currently Co-Editor of  Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice, a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal, sponsored by the College and Research Division of the Pennsylvania Library Association. He earned his MLIS from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Tom Reinsfelder is the Reference & Instruction Librarian at Penn State Mont Alto. He is the Co-Founder and Co-Editor of  Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice, a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal, sponsored by the College and Research Division of the Pennsylvania Library Association. He earned his MSLS  from  Clarion University, and his PhD  from Indiana University of PA. His dissertation research explored aspects of open access to scholarly research.

“The Library as Publisher” with Timothy Deliyannides & Lauren Collister

Academic libraries are increasingly investing in new efforts to support their research and teaching faculty in the activities they care about most.  Learn why becoming a publisher can help meet the most fundamental needs of your research community and at the same time can help transform today’s inflationary cost model for serials.  Using the 35 peer-reviewed journals published by the University Library System, University of Pittsburgh as a case study, we will explore not only why to become a publisher but exactly how to achieve it, step by step, including careful selection of publishing partners, choosing the right platform for manuscript submission and editorial workflow management,  one-time processes to launch a new journal, conducting peer reviews, maintaining academic quality, and measuring impact.  We will close with a review of tools, services, and communities of support to nurture the new library publishing venture.

Lauren B. Collister, Ph.D., is the Electronic Publications Associate for the Office of Scholarly Communication and Publishing, responsible for the day-to-day operations of the 35 e-journals published by the University Library System at the University of Pittsburgh as well as the 45 e-journals hosted by Scholarly Exchange. She works daily with editors and journal managers to navigate the publishing world, including software training, workflow consultation, and technical and editorial support. Lauren comes from an academic research and teaching background, receiving her Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Pittsburgh in 2013, and is the author of several journal articles, book chapters, and conference publications. As part of her academic life, she has been on the author, reviewer, and editor side of the journal publishing process. She is an open access and electronic freedom advocate. You can find her on Twitter at @parnopaeus.

Timothy S. Deliyannides, MSIS.  As Director of the Office of Scholarly Communication and Publishing and Head of Information Technology, Tim Deliyannides is responsible for the extensive electronic publishing initiatives of the University Library System at the University of Pittsburgh.  With over 25 years’ experience in library information technology, Tim has spent the last decade working with academic units and scholarly associations to promote Open Access to research and to help transform models of scholarly publishing.  Tim oversees a number of author self-archiving repositories for research materials including 35 peer reviewed journals and six subject-based repositories, as well as conference proceedings, electronic theses and dissertations, pre-print publications, and other ‘grey literature’ such as white papers and technical reports.  He is the current Chair of the Advisory Committee for the Public Knowledge Project (PKP), the world’s leading developer of open source journal publishing software.

“Paving the way for Open Access” with George Aulisio

In this presentation, the speaker will discuss the trials and tribulations of starting an Open Access policy at a small liberal arts college. The speaker will share his outreach experiences, responses from campus governing bodies, results of an on campus survey that tested faculty awareness and understanding of Open Access, and the next steps for Open Access on his campus.

George Aulisio is Assistant Professor, Public Services librarian, and Outreach Coordinator for The University of Scranton’s Weinberg Memorial Library. He has a Philosophy B.A. from Bloomsburg University, a Library and Information Science M.S. from Drexel University, a Philosophy and Metaphysics M.L.A. from the University of Pennsylvania, and he will be entering the Philosophy PhD program at Temple University in Fall 2014. His library research interests revolve around Copyright, Open Access, Professional Ethics, and Sustainability.

“If you build it, they will come (if you invite them thoughtfully): Institutional Repositories in Academic Libraries” with Eric Jeitner & Janelle Wertzberger

The road to a successful institutional repository is a long and involved one – so where would an interested library begin? What are some important initial considerations? What options exist for repository platforms? Eric Jeitner will discuss some of those considerations, as well as the methodology used to decide on the staging for Arcadia University’s ScholarWorks repository.

After picking a platform, decisions must be made about what work belongs in your IR, and why? How can librarians build campus awareness about open access? Who should be promoting your IR? Janelle Wertzberger will talk about the education and outreach efforts that contributed to early and broad participation by faculty and student authors at Gettysburg College. Less than two years after Gettysburg College launched its institutional repository, The Cupola contains over 1,100 items.

Janelle Wertzberger is the Director of Reference & Instruction and has worked in information literacy instruction and reference since 1997. Her professional interests also include open access scholarship. She manages Gettysburg College’s institutional repository, The Cupola: Scholarship at Gettysburg College. In addition to working in partnership with students and faculty, she regularly designs and implements public programs designed to support curricular inquiry, encourage critical thinking, and enliven the imagination.

Eric Jeitner works as the User Experience Librarian at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. He is interested in the roles that libraries can play in open access, emerging technology, usability, and social justice.

Be sure to REGISTER before May 23!

Connect & Communicate: Connecting PA’s Academic Librarians

April 18, 2014

As a student in a library science master’s degree program, I had never actually worked in a library. I was in banking, and in insurance before that, and in banking before that. Never a library. Having no experience, and knowing that without it I was unlikely to find a job, I felt fortunate to have found an opportunity to volunteer in an academic library, and I viewed the library director who gave me that opportunity as a mentor. I will never forget her telling me what a small world academic librarianship was, and that it was important to cultivate positive relationships with our peers in that small world.

In a few short years, I have learned just how accurate her words were; at every professional development event I attend, I meet people whose names I recognize from somewhere—a blog, an email list, a book, an article, a conference presentation—all of them sharing their knowledge and experience in one form or another.

But I don’t want to wait until I’m at the PaLA Annual Conference, or at a regional Chapter or Round Table workshop to make these kinds of connections. I want them to happen all the time.

When CRD’s Connect & Communicate Series launched in 2012, its founding member, Amy Deuink, envisioned it as a way to provide academic librarians across Pennsylvania with a way to make those connections using technology to close the geographical gap. She saw it (and still does) as a way to create a strong sense of community among academic librarians, a forum for sharing our ideas, interests, and knowledge. It’s an opportunity for teaching and for learning, for professional growth, and for expanding our peer networks.

I see Connect & Communicate as a way to make those connections—the ones that usually happen in those few-and far-between face-to-face settings—happen all the time.

I hope you’ll join this year’s planning committee—Ryan Sittler, Diane Porterfield, Sara Pike, and myself—for some of the discussions we have scheduled for 2014. We encourage you to let us know what you would like to discuss (there is no reason we can’t add MORE discussions for this year!), and to contact us if you want to share something with your community.

Upcoming discussions:
Friday, April 25th, 11:00AM-12:00PM – Outreach in the Academic Library
June 6th (time to be determined) – Digital learning objects/materials; open educational materials
July 25th (time TBD) – RDA: Best practices, problems and work-arounds
August 29th (time TBD) – Managing student assistants
October 31st (time TBD) – Assessment of library instruction
November 21st (time TBD) – Collection development

Have a great presentation or discussion idea? We’d love to hear from you! Please let us know at http://goo.gl/GknoFG

PaLRap Seeks a Co-Editor

April 15, 2014

Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice (PaLRaP) Seeks a Co-Editor

  •          This is a two-year renewable term volunteer opportunity, beginning January, 2015.

Responsibilities

  • Work in close collaboration with a co-editor to manage all aspects of Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice, producing 2 issues each year.
  • Oversee all submissions moving through the publication process from initial submission to peer review, revision, layout, and final proofreading.
  • Work closely with a volunteer editorial team including news editors, copy editors, and layout editors.
  • Recruit and communicate with peer-reviewers as needed.
  • Communicate and work with authors to provide feedback on submissions as well as strong editorial guidance as needed.
  • Prepare editorials for each issue.
  • Oversee use of Online Journal System (OJS) software platform by authors, reviewers, and editorial staff, answering questions about its functionality and recommending best practices
  • Conduct or assist with training of new editorial staff
  • Remain in close communication with the journal publisher, the University Library System, University of Pittsburgh and the journal sponsor, the College & Research Division (CRD) of the Pennsylvania Library Association (PaLA).
  • Solicit submissions for all types of articles.

Required Qualifications

  • Experience writing for professional publications.  Editorial experience preferred.
  • Significant experience working in Pennsylvania libraries.
  • Knowledge of issues related to open access scholarly publishing.
  • Current member of the College & Research Division of the Pennsylvania Library Association.
  • Excellent communication skills required. Co -Editor must be willing and able to respond to numerous email messages in a timely manner.
  •          Submit a letter of interest and a resume to Val Lynn, PaLA College & Research Division Chair.

Academic Libraries’ Role in Sustainability Education

April 7, 2014

Earth Day (April 22) is fast approaching. Undoubtedly, campuses across PA will be celebrating by inviting guest speakers, holding electronics recycling drives, hosting Earth Day fairs, screening environmentally themed films, and so on. Many colleges and universities do so much for Earth Day that they find one day simply isn’t enough and expand the events out to Earth Week or even Earth Month. I am a proponent of sustainability initiatives on campus and believe that universities have a special obligation to not only educate about environmental issues and the importance of sustainability, but also to lead by example and practice what we preach.

If your library hasn’t found a way to participate in Earth Day events yet, it may be too late for your library to take part this year; however, this is a good opportunity to learn what other academic libraries are doing to celebrate the Earth and sustainability, take time to reflect, and begin planning early for ways your library can play a major role in next year’s events.

Earth Day is a wonderful thing, but it is of course just a day put in place to remind us of the aphorism “Every day is Earth Day.” With that in mind, as you begin to think about participating in next year’s Earth Day events, it is even more important to think about how your library can become a sustainability leader throughout the year. Libraries, primarily known for resource sharing, are based in the very idea of sustainability; however, that does not mean our contribution begins and ends there. As noted, many universities across PA have incorporated sustainability initiatives into their operations and they have even included the importance of it in their missions. Academic libraries are academic departments in their own right that also double as busy social hubs; therefore, as educators we have a responsibility to play our part in sustainability education and as caretakers of busy campus centers, we have special obligations to use our environment to teach students about sustainability and lead by example.

In conclusion, if your library is participating in Earth Day events or has a sustainability component in your mission or daily operations, please share what you are doing in the comment section of this blog post so that other libraries can also consider adopting those practices. If you are not currently active or feel that you could be more active, I urge you to check the comments section, visit various PA library blogs and websites in order to keep an eye out for ways libraries are championing sustainability and participating in Earth Day events so that you can position your library as a sustainability leader on campus as well.

What’s so special about reference librarians?

April 3, 2014

Recently, my closest friend from my undergraduate days contacted me with an interesting question.  She asked “If you were going to hire a reference librarian who did not have any actual librarian experience, what skills would that person have to have for you to even consider sitting down to talk to the person?  Especially if it were a small town public library within a large county library system?”

For me, this is a very tough question – the librarians at my college have faculty rank, so they must have accredited MLS degrees.  I couldn’t even consider hiring a librarian who isn’t a professional, degreed librarian.

But perhaps other libraries may not be so rigid in defining reference librarians, so I started to think about the needed attributes:  significant organizational skills, the ability to be frequently interrupted and still complete tasks on schedule, well-developed interpersonal skills for dealing with some truly odd questions, persistence in locating obscure sources, knowledge of various citation styles, the ability to elicit sufficient information to get to the true information need, the ability to assist in collection development of reference sources, a sufficient technology comfort level for chat/text/IM reference, the technology skills for database set-up, maintenance, troubleshooting and training, and on and on and on.  There really are quite a few skills needed, and I guess that’s why we have degrees in library science.

This exchange, an exercise in imagination really, led me to think about why all of those skills are necessary – and it led me to wonder how necessary the degree is compared to the skills.  Many academic libraries have successfully trained students to staff the reference desk; sometimes these are graduate students, and sometimes they are undergrads, but in all cases, they are perceived as peers and thus are less intimidating than librarians (or at least that’s how the theory goes…)

My library happens to employ quite a few undergraduates who intend to go on for an MLS degree – why couldn’t they help to staff the reference desk?  They could certainly answer all of the directional questions, they’re more than capable of unjamming the printers, they know as much about the library’s website as our librarians do, and they could be very effective at doing reference “triage” and then referring students to librarians when needed.  With appropriate training, our undergraduate students could become a valuable bridge between the research-panicked 18-22 year old student and a professional librarian.

That could create a win-win-win situation.  The reference desk student would gain valuable experience, the student patron would receive the help they need, and the librarians devote time to other projects until their expertise is needed.  I’m in a tricky position, where we have to be clear about who is a librarian (and thus a faculty member) and who is a library technician (and thus not a faculty member), but maybe it’s time to consider the possibilities of giving our librarians-to-be some additional responsibilities – and opportunities.

Are you’re successfully staffing your reference desk with student employees?  Please share!

Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice (PaLRaP) Seeks a Co-Editor

April 1, 2014

Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice (PaLRaP) Seeks a Co-Editor

  •          This is a two-year renewable term volunteer opportunity, beginning January, 2015.

Responsibilities

  • Work in close collaboration with a co-editor to manage all aspects of Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice, producing 2 issues each year.
  • Oversee all submissions moving through the publication process from initial submission to peer review, revision, layout, and final proofreading.
  • Work closely with a volunteer editorial team including news editors, copy editors, and layout editors.
  • Recruit and communicate with peer-reviewers as needed.
  • Communicate and work with authors to provide feedback on submissions as well as strong editorial guidance as needed.
  • Prepare editorials for each issue.
  • Oversee use of Online Journal System (OJS) software platform by authors, reviewers, and editorial staff, answering questions about its functionality and recommending best practices
  • Conduct or assist with training of new editorial staff
  • Remain in close communication with the journal publisher, the University Library System, University of Pittsburgh and the journal sponsor, the College & Research Division (CRD) of the Pennsylvania Library Association (PaLA).
  • Solicit submissions for all types of articles.

Required Qualifications

  • Experience writing for professional publications.  Editorial experience preferred.
  • Significant experience working in Pennsylvania libraries.
  • Knowledge of issues related to open access scholarly publishing.
  • Current member of the College & Research Division of the Pennsylvania Library Association.
  • Excellent communication skills required. Co -Editor must be willing and able to respond to numerous email messages in a timely manner.

 

  •          Submit a letter of interest and a resume to Val Lynn, PaLA College & Research Division Chair.

Middle States Standards for Higher Education Town Hall Meeting

March 26, 2014
by

I am posting this on behalf of Russell Hall, PSU Associate Librarian, regarding his attendance at a town hall meeting about Middle States standards for higher education:

“At the town hall meeting I went to last week, the good news is that the chair of the committee stated that information literacy would be put back into the standards in the next revision. The bad news is that libraries are not mentioned at all in the document. The way I see it, this could jeopardize our standing in not just our institution, but across higher education.  What you can do, and I urge you to do this, is email policy@MSCHE.org your comments about why libraries deserve specific and explicit mention in the new standards. The goal of the new standards is to focus on the student learning experience and student learning outcomes, so if you can tie your comments to those concepts, it’s likely you’ll make more of an impact.”

Also of possible interest related to this is Steven Bell’s post for the ACRL Insider Blog about this issue from February: http://www.acrl.ala.org/acrlinsider/archives/8299

For more information about the Middle States rough draft: https://www.msche.org/?Nav1=NEWS&Nav2=NEWSROOM&Nav3=STANDARDS&strPageName=

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