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TCLC’s Annual Spring Program for 2015

January 27, 2015

“The Maker Movement & You: Creating, Collaborating, and Crafting in your Library”

SugarLoaf Hill, Chestnut Hill College, April 24th, 9:30am to 3:30pm

TCLC (Tri-State College Library Cooperative) invites all library staff to explore ways you can turn your library into a maker space, a place where library and user interest converge to create ideas, projects or objects – and all on a shoestring budget! See how academic and public libraries are collaborating within their communities. Come learn how to prime your physical space for innovation and creation.

Refer to the attachment link below for speakers and program descriptions.

TCLC Spring Program 2015 Save the date

Free Webinar — Assessment Management Systems

January 20, 2015
The Teaching, Learning, and Technology (TL&T) Roundtable is hosting a free webinar for librarians titled, “Assessment Management Systems: What Are They and Why Should I Care?”The webinar will be held on February 11 from 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.  It will feature Jackie Belanger as the keynote speaker, who is the assessment coordinator for the University of Washington Libraries.  Jackie has co-authored several articles on library uses of assessment management systems. The webinar will include information on what assessment management systems are, why they are useful, and how librarians can use them effectively.  Two librarians from Harrisburg Area Community College will also share their experiences choosing and implementing an assessment management system.

The webinar’s brochure can be accessed from TL&T’s web page.

Register on the PaLA website at http://www.palibraries.org/events/Sessions.aspx?id=583113

Questions? Please contact:

 
Christine Iannicelli
Chair of Teaching, Learning, and Technology Roundtable
610-647-4400 ext. 3831
ciannicelli@immaculata.edu

Connect & Communicate: Safety and Security in the Campus Library

January 12, 2015

Safety and Security in the Campus Library
A Connect & Communicate Series Discussion

Friday, January 30, 12:00pm

During this hour, academic librarians are invited to share their experiences confronting dangerous situations in the library, as well as their concerns, thoughts, ideas, and suggestions for keeping themselves and their patrons safe.

This will be an informal discussion, during which all attendees are encouraged to participate. The easiest way to participate is through the use of a headset with microphone, but attendees may alternately participate via chat.

Register at the following link: http://goo.gl/forms/XWR9Y96Hjg

Join the conversation on Friday, January 30, at 12:00 p.m. at http://centralpenn.adobeconnect.com/crdccs/

  • For this program, participants are encouraged to utilize a headset with microphone. However, a headset is not required, and participants may join the discussion via the meeting room chat box.
  • A recording of the program will be made available to PaLA members.

Before the Discussion:

To test your computer (recommended): http://centralpenn.adobeconnect.com/crdccs/

To run the Adobe Connect Meeting Connection Diagnostic:http://admin.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

If you would like to be emailed directly about this and other upcoming Connect & Communicate Series events, you may provide us with your name and email address here: http://goo.gl/4urXl . (If you submitted previously, you are still on our list.)

Please continue to share your ideas for programming topics, speakers, or formats with us! We’re getting some great suggestions and themes are starting to emerge, but we could also use some more speaker names. If you or someone you know is doing something great in Pennsylvania’s academic libraries, tell us about it!

The Connect & Communicate Series of online programming offered by the PaLA College & Research Division aims to help foster a community of academic librarians in Pennsylvania. Please contact Jill Hallam-Miller at jillhallam-miller@centralpenn.edu or at 717-728-2415 with questions.

PaLRaP now accepting submissions

December 9, 2014

Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice (PaLRaP) is now accepting submissions for research, practice, and commentary articles and for news items for the March issue. Manuscripts are welcomed at any time; however, for full consideration for the March issue, please submit your manuscripts by January 30, 2015. See palrap.org for submission guidelines.

PaLRaP is a peer reviewed, online, open access publication of the Pennsylvania Library Association’s College & Research Division. This journal will provide an opportunity for librarians in Pennsylvania to share their knowledge and experience with practicing librarians across the Commonwealth and beyond. It includes articles from all areas of librarianship, with a special focus on activities at or of interest to Pennsylvania’s academic libraries.

When available, audio and video content will supplement text based documents.

Published biannually: March and October

Editors: Anne Behler, Penn State University; John Barnett, University of Pittsburgh

Peer reviewers: Members of the Pennsylvania library community.

#palrap

Connect & Communicate Event: Navigating Health Information for Academic Libraries

November 17, 2014

Navigating Health Information for Academic Libraries:
A National Network of Libraries of Medicine Presentation

Friday, December 5, 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

Have you been wondering how PA Forward PA Forward Logo RGBis relevant to you and your academic library? You won’t want to miss this health literacy presentation for academic librarians!

4_Health_4CPresenters:

Jody Cole, Director of the Shippensburg Public Library and Co-Chair of the Health Literacy Planning Team for PA Forward: Opening Comments: PA Forward and Health Literacy in the Academic Library

Missy Harvey, Technology & Communication Coordinator, National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region (NN/LM MAR): Navigating Health Information for Academic Libraries

This class, presented by Missy Harvey of NN/LM MAR, is for academic librarians to learn more about how their faculty/students can research the health, chemical, and environmental literature; find consumer health information; and learn about mobile apps to find what they need. Includes introductions to PubMed, Medline Plus, PubChem, TOXNET, Genetics Home Reference, Drug Information Portal, ClinicalTrials.gov, as well as other free databases/services from the National Library of Medicine (NLM).

Click here to REGISTER for the event.

  • For this program, participants will need a phone to provide audio—VoIP will not be used.
  • Instructions for how to join the class online will be emailed to all registrants on Deccember 4th.
  • A recording of the program will be made available to PaLA members following the program.

If you would like to be emailed directly about this and other upcoming Connect & Communicate Series events, you may provide us with your name and email address here: http://goo.gl/4urXl . (If you submitted previously, you are still on our list.)

Please continue to share your ideas for programming topics, speakers, or formats with us! We’re getting some great suggestions and themes are starting to emerge, but we could also use some more speaker names. If you or someone you know is doing something great in Pennsylvania’s academic libraries, tell us about it!

The Connect & Communicate Series of online programming offered by the PaLA College & Research Division aims to help foster a community of academic librarians in Pennsylvania. Please contact Jill Hallam-Miller at jillhallam-miller@centralpenn.edu or at 717-728-2415 with questions.

Fall 2014 issue of Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice is now available online

November 13, 2014

The Fall 2014 issue of Pennsylvania Libraries: Research & Practice (PaLRaP) is now online at palrap.org

Articles include:

  • Pennsylvania Public Libraries and the Great Flood of 1936: Dark Clouds and Silver Linings (Bernadette Lear)
  •  Pennsylvania Academic Libraries and Student Retention and Graduation: A Preliminary Investigation with Confusing Results (Greg Crawford)
  • The Life Cycle of a PaLRaP Article and Other Updates (John Barnett & Tom Reinsfelder)
  • Perceptions of Value: A Story from One Pennsylvania Community (Linda Neyer)
  • Problem-Based Learning and Information Literacy: A Natural Partnership (Kate Wenger)
  • Capture All the URLs: First Steps in Web Archiving (Alexis Antracoli, Steven Duckworth, Judith Silva, Kristen Yarmey)
  • Weeding, Wine, and Cheese: Enticing Faculty to Cull a Collection (Judith Anne Koveleskie)
  • Noteworthy: News Briefs from PA Libraries (Linda Neyer & Larissa Gordon)

If you would like to comment on articles and/or receive individual email announcements for new issues, please register as a user at www.palrap.com. Also, when sharing articles via social media, please include our #palrap hashtag.

PaLRaP is an open access, peer reviewed publication sharing information about the research and practices at or of interest to Pennsylvania’s academic libraries. PaLRap is run by a volunteer staff of CRD members, each with two year terms in various journal management positions, and it is published by the University Library System (ULS), University of Pittsburgh, through its E-Journal Publishing Program.

Integrating scholarly ideas into popular websites

November 11, 2014

It seems like one of the most common pieces of advice for librarians is that we should try to “be where our students are,” or more generally, “be where our users are.” This can be accomplished in countless ways, whether it’s reaching out to students with your library’s Facebook page or embedding reference librarians in online courses. Even though it’s an ongoing effort, I feel like librarians have been pretty good at making themselves present in such environments. But what about information itself? That is – good information? Should we try to make that “be where our users are,” as well?

I’ve noticed a few trends that have made me think a lot about this lately. One is the rise of websites like BuzzFeed and Reddit which are increasingly being used (especially by young people) as information sources. According to a Chronicle blog post, one USC professor believes that we can harness the popularity of these sites in order to introduce students to more meaningful, in-depth topics; he’s even created a manifesto for “BuzzAdemia,” a new journal intended for ‘BuzzFeed-style scholarship.’ Rather than sharing ideas in the traditional scholarly format, authors would create a short, readable piece which incorporates the features that BuzzFeed is so popular for – humor, memes, “listicles,” and so on.

One example of what a “BuzzAdemia” article might look like is grad student Chris Rodley’s “Post-Structuralism Explained With Hipster Beards,” which has apparently gotten over 220,000 page views.

Another trend is students’ attraction to sources like Wikipedia which contain user-generated, easy-to-read content. One website that is rising to popularity is Genius.com, a place where user-generated annotations act as a supplement to various forms of text or media: lyrics, articles, audio scripts, book chapters, poems, medicine bottle labels, etc. Consider a TED talk given by physician Atul Gawande in 2012. Although TED talks are potentially rich sources of information, students could have trouble comprehending Gawande’s ideas for several reasons. If he uses the word, “digitalis,” how do they know what that means? If he claims that 2 million people per year are inflicted with hospital-acquired infections, how do they know that statement is true? And what kind of infections? By reading the annotations — which could consist of text, links, images, video, or all of the above —  the Genius platform provides an opportunity to learn such details.

(See Gawande’s TED talk on Genius.com. Click the highlighted passages for annotations.)

I think concepts like “BuzzAdemia” and Genius.com definitely provide potential for integrating scholarly ideas into popular websites. But I admit that I have some mixed feelings about it, too. Would students be any more receptive to scholarly content if it’s mixed in with popular content (or resembles popular content)? How would we determine if it had a positive impact on their learning or research processes? Would they even notice it?

What do you think?

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